Morse code translator

December 7, 2017 2:12 pm

Translate Morse code banner

To most of us it’s just a flurry of dots and dashes or a series of repetitive beeps, but historically speaking Morse code has been a very important means of communicating.

Named after co-developer Samuel F. B. Morse, this method of transmitting text information through a series of on-off tones, lights or clicks to be decoded and understood by the receiver has been used in many different ways since its inception. For example, it has been used in times of war, in the aviation industry, in amateur radio and for assisting people with disabilities to communicate.

Take a look at the graphic below to see how the English alphabet is represented in Morse code.

 

Morse Code Alphabet

Have you ever wondered how your name was written in Morse code? Or maybe you’d rather put your favourite movie quote or song lyrics into this form?

Whatever you happen to be curious about you can convert it here using Cryptii’s special tool for encoding and decoding Morse code.

 


 

Sources

  • Wikipedia, Morse Code. Available here [accessed on 05/12/17]
  • Cryptii, Morse code translator: Encode and Convert online. Available here [accessed on 05/12/17].

 

Written by

Liam Kennedy – Schuman Trainee at the Terminology Coordination Unit of the European Parliament. Graduate of Journalism with a Language (French) at Dublin Institute of Technology. Completed a Masters in Translation Studies at University College Cork.

 

 

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  • Ivan Kanič

    I would call it transcription, not translation. Do you agree?

  • Conan

    Have you ever wondered how did the SMS notification alert sound on the first cellphones?
    Three dots, two dashes, three dots.
    Did you remember Executive Decision (1997)?
    – Nobody uses Morse code now.
    – Except navy pilots.